Stimulant treatment for ADHD may also reduce smoking risk

 

MNT
Written by David McNamee 12 May 2014

Stimulant treatment for ADHD may also reduce smoking risk

Duke researchers published results in the journal Pediatrics showing “a significant association” between stimulant treatment for ADHD and lower smoking rates. They also found the effect to be larger in those with more severe ADHD as well as those who continuously took stimulant medications.

According to Dr. Harold Levinson, research has shown that adults with ADHD smoke at twice the rate of adults without ADHD. Youth with ADHD are two to three times more likely to smoke than those without ADHD, and they start earlier.
By showing that stimulant treatment may be helpful in minimizing other addictions such as smoking, it is apparent that adding control or enhanced inhibition functioning is a vital overall benefit of stimulants in holistically treating ADHD and its varied other comorbid disorders . And by minimizing the severe health risks of smoking, many individuals are spared illnesses far greater in severity than any mistakenly attributed to the carefully managed use of stimulants for ADHD.

About Harold Levinson, M.D.
Formerly Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry at New York University Medical Center, Dr. Harold Levinson is currently Director of the Levinson Medical Center for Learning Disabilities in Long Island, New York. He is a well-known neuropsychiatrist, clinical researcher and author. For more information, call 1(800)334-7323 or visit: http://www.dyslexiaonline.com

SOURCE: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/276703.php

By Harold Levinson, M.D.

Photo Courtesy of Tuelekza/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

About Dr. Harold Levinson
About Harold Levinson, M.D. Formerly Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry at New York University Medical Center, Dr. Harold Levinson is currently Director of the Levinson Medical Center for Learning Disabilities in Long Island, New York. He is a well-known neuropsychiatrist, clinical researcher and author. For more information, call 1(800) 334-7323 or visit: http://www.dyslexiaonline.com

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