Report Says Medication Use Is Rising for Adults With Attention Disorder

Overtreatment of ADHD in adults

The number of young American adults taking medications for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder nearly doubled from 2008 to 2012, according to a report to be released Wednesday by the nation’s largest prescription drug manager, Express Scripts. Although some experts said the report provided the clearest evidence to date that the disorder is being diagnosed and treated with medication far beyond reasonable rates, others indicate otherwise.

According to Dr. Harold Levinson

This increase in diagnosis and treatment is due largely to an increased understanding of ADHD. In Total Concentration Levinson was first to recognize that the incidence of ADHD was closer to 10% than the 2% considered at the time. And the reason was simple: The majority of ADHD having milder but significant symptoms were mistakenly omitted from proper diagnosis. Similarly, Levinson recognized in Smart But Feeling Dumb that the true incidence of dyslexia was close to 10% vs. 2%. The reason for this error was similar to that occurring with ADHD: only the severest cases were diagnosed with dyslexia due to a mistaken definition encompassing only a minority of the severest cases. And meds or their sales had no role in increased recognition.

About Harold Levinson, M.D.

Formerly Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry at New York University Medical Center, Dr. Harold Levinson is currently Director of the Levinson Center for Learning Disabilities in Long Island, New York. He is a well-known neuropsychiatrist, clinical researcher and author.

By Harold Levinson

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About Dr. Harold Levinson
About Harold Levinson, M.D. Formerly Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry at New York University Medical Center, Dr. Harold Levinson is currently Director of the Levinson Medical Center for Learning Disabilities in Long Island, New York. He is a well-known neuropsychiatrist, clinical researcher and author. For more information, call 1(800) 334-7323 or visit: http://www.dyslexiaonline.com

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