Reading Experience May Change the Brains of Dyslexic Students

 

The New York Times
By ANNIE MURPHY PAUL MAY 15, 2014

Reading improves brain cells in dyslexia

Research led by Guinevere Eden, director of the Center for the Study of Learning at Georgetown University Medical Center contends that Dyslexia is not a problem of seeing, but a problem of processing language, of assembling individual sounds into words.

Visual deficits, according to the latest thinking, are not the cause of dyslexia. They are a result of less reading, of experience. Ms. Eden’s research indicates that this disparity in gray matter, like dyslexics’ visual deficits, is caused by less experience with reading. When the right experience (intensive tutoring and more reading time) is introduced, the amount of gray matter in dyslexics’ brains comes to resemble that of normal readers.

According to Dr. Harold Levinson, the above theories of dyslexia presented by Eden and others have very little explanatory capability and are incompatible with a vast array of data characterizing the vast majority of dyslexics. In fact, all reading and non-reading dyslexic symptoms can be replicated by spinning normal individuals around until they and their signals are dizzy.
As researched by Levinson, dyslexia is a syndrome of many reading and non-reading symptoms. This syndrome results when initially normal brain structures fail to adequately compensate for the “dizzy” or scrambled signals received and transmitted. And these dizzy signals result from a fine-tuning impairment within the inner-ear and its supercomputer-the cerebellum. This theory simply explains why most dyslexics have coexisting non-reading writing, spelling, math, memory, speech…symptoms, are characterized by only balance and coordinations signs and symptoms of inner-ear origin, have normal and superior cerebral brains, and respond favorably to inner-ear-enhancing meds and therapies.

The cerebellar signal theory of dyslexia also explains why non-reading secondarily decreases cerebral cells, whereas reading stimulates their growth. By analogy, not using muscles leads to atrophy, and the reverse.

About Harold Levinson, M.D.
Formerly Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry at New York University Medical Center, Dr. Harold Levinson is currently Director of the Levinson Medical Center for Learning Disabilities in Long Island, New York. He is a well-known neuropsychiatrist, clinical researcher and author. For more information, call 1(800)334-7323 or visit: http://www.dyslexiaonline.com
Source: http://parenting.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/05/15/reading-experience-may-change-the-brains-of-dyslexic-students

By Harold Levinson, M.D.

Photo courtesy of Pannawat/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

About Dr. Harold Levinson
About Harold Levinson, M.D. Formerly Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry at New York University Medical Center, Dr. Harold Levinson is currently Director of the Levinson Medical Center for Learning Disabilities in Long Island, New York. He is a well-known neuropsychiatrist, clinical researcher and author. For more information, call 1(800) 334-7323 or visit: http://www.dyslexiaonline.com

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