Dyslexia exists when properly understood and defined, claims Dr. Harold Levinson

The distinguished authors of The Dyslexia Debate have mistakenly overlooked challenging research proving dyslexia’s existence and solving its many riddles. 

According to neuropsychiatrist Dr. Harold Levinson, the authors of The Dyslexia Debate have justifiably refuted the traditionally maintained but erroneous scientific myths about dyslexia. However, Professors Elliott and Grigorenko failed to consider a non-traditional dyslexia hypothesis and solution that was initially published in 1973, and later proved by Dr. Levinson. And they’ve failed to ask and/or answer many of the vital questions Levinson provided in a challenging expose called A Scientific Watergate– Dyslexia.
For example:

Harold Levinson, M.D.

“Denying and renaming dyslexia is akin to reconsidering and treating diabetes as only a dietary problem.”

  • What if dyslexics do not have primary cerebral problems in decoding or comprehending the clear reading signals received as traditionally believed for over a century?
  • What if dyslexia is a diverse cluster of coexisting reading and non-reading symptoms varying from severe to overcompensated rather than just a major reading comprehension disorder?
  • What if the invariable presence of only balance and coordination neurological signs diagnostic of an inner-ear and cerebellar dysfunction among all dyslexics were evidence that dyslexia is of a primary cerebellar origin, and that their thinking brains were normal and even superior?
  • What if all dyslexic symptoms were caused by normal brains failing to secondarily process the inner-ear determined scrambled or “dizzy” signals received and transmitted?
  • What if “transient dyslexic” reading and non-reading symptoms normally arise after spinning and disappear when dizzy sensations and signals improve spontaneously and/or following treatment with inner-ear-improving medications and related therapies?
Based on a “highly original” research effort spanning more than 4 decades and encompassing the clinical data derived from over 35,000 dyslexic children and adults, Levinson answered all the above questions and many more.
By contrast to the century-old traditional conviction than dyslexia was just a severe reading comprehension or decoding disorder of primary cerebral origin, dyslexia was re- conceptualized by Levinson as a syndrome of coexisting reading and non-reading (writing, spelling, math, memory, speech, sensory-motor, concentration, etc.) symptoms. And all dyslexic symptoms were reasoned to occur when initially normal brain structures failed to recognize or compensate for the inner-ear/cerebellar determined scrambled or “dizzy” signals received and transmitted.
Thus one simple fine-tuning dysfunction radiating scrambled signals to multiple normal brain structures easily explained the scores of typical but diverse and improving symptoms characterizing most all dyslexics as well as the presence of only cerebellar neurological signs. ”How can ‘brain damage theories’ logically explain successful, gifted and famous dyslexics as well as the often favorable prognosis among dyslexics,” asks Levinson? Importantly,
Levinson also demonstrated that 75-85% of dyslexics and all their cerebellar determined symptoms responded favorably, rapidly and often
dramatically to safe combinations of inner-ear-enhancing medications and nutrients. In addition, the ensuing insights led him to devise new medically-based methods of screening, diagnosis, treatment and even prevention. By contrast, the traditionalist brain damage theories of dyslexia led nowhere scientifically since initially proposed over a century ago.
By mistakenly concluding that dyslexia is only an educational problem requiring only remediation of its diverse reading symptoms, the authors of The Dyslexia Debate have, according to Levinson, “unwittingly taken one giant scientific step backward after refuting the brain damage theory and definition of dyslexia. If their denial of both dyslexia and all its supporting clinical, neuroimaging and related research is not properly clarified, the negative therapeutic impact to suffering millions would be tragically akin to erroneously reconsidering and treating diabetes as only a dietary problem.”

About Harold Levinson, M.D.

Formerly Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry at New York University Medical Center, Dr. Harold Levinson is currently Director of the Levinson Medical Center for Learning Disabilities in Long Island, New York. He is a well-known neuropsychiatrist, clinical researcher and author.

By Harold Levinson, M.D.

 

For more information Contact Us: call 1(800)334-7323 or visit www.dyslexiaonline.com

About Dr. Harold Levinson
About Harold Levinson, M.D. Formerly Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry at New York University Medical Center, Dr. Harold Levinson is currently Director of the Levinson Medical Center for Learning Disabilities in Long Island, New York. He is a well-known neuropsychiatrist, clinical researcher and author. For more information, call 1(800) 334-7323 or visit: http://www.dyslexiaonline.com

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