Comorbid Anxiety Impairs Function, QoL in ADHD Kids

Medscape Medical News
Pam Harrison 2/22/14

Levinson’s research indicates that ADHD, Anxiety, dyslexia or LD all have a common inner-ear/cerebellar origin and thus are all comorbid

A study that was published April 21 in Pediatrics revealed ADHD children with 2 or more comorbid anxiety disorders have impaired functioning, problematic behavior, and a poorer quality of life (QoL) compared with children with ADHD who have 1 or no anxiety disorders.

According to Dr. Harold Levinson, this important study highlighting the comorbidity of ADHD with anxiety disorders.
However, it failed to explain the reasons for this overlapping as well as that of dyslexia or learning disorders, imbalance and dyscoordination, etc.

Levinson’s research, independently validated, reveals that all the above disorders, including dyslexia and ADHD, are due a common fine-tuning dysfunction within the inner-ear and its supercomputer, the cerebellum. The diverse symptoms and disorders arise when initially normal brain structures secondarily fail to adequately process the dizzy or scrambled signals received and transmitted. Indeed, Levinson demonstrated that most phobias and related anxiety symptoms have inner-ear dysfunctioning mechanisms. And most anxiety symptoms respond favorably to inner-ear-enhancing meds together with SSRI’S. The latter are best described in Phobia Free.

About Harold Levinson, M.D.
Formerly Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry at New York University Medical Center, Dr. Harold Levinson is currently Director of the Levinson Medical Center for Learning Disabilities in Long Island, New York. He is a well-known neuropsychiatrist, clinical researcher and author. For more information, call 1(800)334-7323 or visit: http://www.dyslexiaonline.com

By Harold Levinson, M.D.

About Dr. Harold Levinson
About Harold Levinson, M.D. Formerly Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry at New York University Medical Center, Dr. Harold Levinson is currently Director of the Levinson Medical Center for Learning Disabilities in Long Island, New York. He is a well-known neuropsychiatrist, clinical researcher and author. For more information, call 1(800) 334-7323 or visit: http://www.dyslexiaonline.com

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