1 in 5 Ivy Leaguers at an undisclosed school report ADHD drug misuse

 

The Washington Post
BY LINDSEY BEVER May 5, 2014

Unsupervised misuse of stimulants can be dangerous
According to a new study presented at the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) meeting in Vancouver, one in five students at an undisclosed Ivy League university have misused them at least once to gain an academic edge. However, unsupervised misuse can be dangerous. Thus Jon LaPook, chief medical correspondent for CBS News, reported that the risks of stimulant use include heart attack, stroke, psychosis and even death. And another report released last year by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, emergency room visits for non-medical use of stimulants tripled between 2005 and 2011.

According to Dr. Harold Levinson, it is obvious that unsupervised stimulant intake can be dangerous especially when abused daily in high doses. This severity may not apply to the college students within this study and so the risks may be less, albeit present. Clearly, it is crucial to provide all college students with counseling to help minimize this academic pandemic. Drug testing should even be considered to discourage this dangerous practice.

About Harold Levinson, M.D.
Formerly Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry at New York University Medical Center, Dr. Harold Levinson is currently Director of the Levinson Medical Center for Learning Disabilities in Long Island, New York. He is a well-known neuropsychiatrist, clinical researcher and author. For more information, call 1(800)334-7323 or visit: http://www.dyslexiaonline.com

Source: http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2014/05/05/1-in-5-ivy-leaguers-at-an-undisclosed-school-report-adhd-drug-misuse

By Harold Levinson, M.D.

Photo Courtesy of Fantasia/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

About Dr. Harold Levinson
About Harold Levinson, M.D. Formerly Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry at New York University Medical Center, Dr. Harold Levinson is currently Director of the Levinson Medical Center for Learning Disabilities in Long Island, New York. He is a well-known neuropsychiatrist, clinical researcher and author. For more information, call 1(800) 334-7323 or visit: http://www.dyslexiaonline.com

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